Tab Application Banner
  • Users Online: 757
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 55-64

Roadmap to vasculitis: a rheumatological treasure hunt


1 Department of Medicine/Invärtes Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki; ORTON Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, Helsinki; COXA Hospital for Joint Replacement, Tampere, Finland
2 Department of Medicine/Invärtes Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki
3 Department of Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
4 Institute of Experimental & Clinical Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

Correspondence Address:
Y T Konttinen
Department of Medicine/Invärtes Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki; ORTON Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, Helsinki; COXA Hospital for Joint Replacement, Tampere, Finland

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Since the triggering factors causing primary vasculitides are by definition not (yet) known, we have to classify them to clinical syndromes based on the size, site, type and effect of the blood vessel involvement. ACR classification cri- teria and Chapel Hill nomenclature are useful tools to familiarize with the primary vasculitides, although a lot of crit- icism has been voiced in the literature indicating that they only represent the best available consensus. The present text takes advantage of the recent developments such as introduction of the anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic auto (ANCA) antibodies, and divides the vasculitides to those affecting typically the large, medium and small arteries or only small blood vessels. In addition, some vasculitides, which are still difficult to place to the vasculitis map, like Bόrger's disease, Goodpasture's syndrome, primary angiitin of the central nervous system (PACNS) and panniculitis, are dealt with. As it is a long and winding road, attention has to be paid to the clinical details to follow the road sign to "pseudovasculitis", when that is the right way to go. They represent a bunch of non-vasculitic conditions, which lead to structural or vasospastic impairment of the blood flow, bleeding or thromboembolism and hyperviscosity. These imitators have to some extent, similar clinical symptoms and signs as well as laboratory and radiological findings to those found in true systemic vasculitides. This also emphasizes the importance of internal medicine as the intellectual (albeit not necessarily organizational) home of rheumatology and rheumatologists as we deal with conditions like atherosclerosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, infectious endocarditic, myxoma of the heart and cholesterol embolism.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed306    
    Printed29    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded44    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal