Tab Application Banner
  • Users Online: 616
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 2-9

Analysis of evidence to determine the link between Takayasu's arteritis and Tuberculosis


1 Department of Rheumatology, Saifee Hospital and Medical Research Center, Charni Road, Mumbai 400 004, India
2 Department of Medicine, Saifee Hospital and Medical Research Center, Charni Road, Mumbai 400 004, India

Correspondence Address:
Arun R Chogle
Department of Rheumatology, Saifee Hospital and Medical Research Center, Charni Road, Mumbai 400 004
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.1016/j.injr.2014.09.001

Rights and Permissions

Objective: The relationship of Takayasu's arteritis (TA) and Tuberculosis (TB) has been suggested for decades but convincing evidence is lacking. The aim of this study is to assess the published evidence for an association between TA and TB. Method: We performed a systematic search of the MEDLINE database through PubMed using MeSH headings and keywords for "Takayasu's arteritis" and "Tuberculosis". Results: Thirty seven publications were analysed. The sites of TB lesions in these TA cases were mainly found in lymph nodes and lungs and occasionally in the internal organs and skin. One histopathological study did not support the direct role of mycobacterium TB in the pathogenesis of arterial lesions while the other suggested that the arterial damage could occur due to previous TB infection. Regional differences in the prevalence of TB may have influenced the validity of the results. The laboratory studies support the idea of molecular mimicry between mycobacterium heat shock protein (mHSP65) and its human homologue (hHSP60) driving immune response in TA. Based on the epidemiological, immunological and genetic factors, three hypotheses have been proposed to explain the TA and TB link. Conclusions: The mycobacterium theory can neither be confirmed nor excluded with cer- tainty. The proposed hypotheses require future confirmatory studies. Randomised controlled trials are needed to ascertain safety of biologics in TA cases with associated TB infection.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1454    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded114    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal